‘I knew we were kindred spirits’ – letters from our readers

Letters from our readers

‘I knew we were kindred spirits’

Apostrophe magazine endorses and represents everything we at The Rhythmic Arts Project believe in: independence, self-advocacy, appropriate language, inclusion and jobs for folks with intellectual differences, special education and Special Olympics, to name just a few. Everyone is teachable.

The Rhythmic Arts Project originated in Santa Barbara. As our program was expanding, it wasn’t long before I began wandering around the country demonstrating the program in various organizations. New interventions were not readily accepted 15 years ago. I found as a rule, not everyone was willing to push the envelope; with a few exceptions the status quo was the typical mode of operation throughout the population.

I was met with skepticism more than acceptance. Seeing a guy walk into their facilities with long hair and tattoos, a cane in one hand and a bongo in the other, they didn’t see me as their typical presenter.

I was told our students wouldn’t read or write, let alone understand basic musical notation. In addition, they may not behave properly in a group environment, learn to take turns, listen or respect one another. After hearing this more times than I care to quote, my credo became “Please don’t tell me what they cannot do; let’s work together to help them accomplish everything they can.”

So you might imagine, when I saw Apostrophe’s “Forget can’t and don’t; think can and do” I knew we were kindred spirits. Thank you for including us in the spring issue, we sincerely appreciate it.

Eddie Tuduri, Founder
The Rhythmic Arts Project
Santa Barbara, Calif.
www.traponline.org

Balanced, educational, informative

It is my great honor to have authored my first article, “Creative Activities,” in your Spring 2013 issue. Having now read two issues cover-to-cover since becoming aware of your fine magazine, my overwhelming thought is that more people need to know about you! Those of us who love someone, are caregivers or who provide services for those with special needs know of their challenges with everyday life.

Mitri Hadid

Mitri Hadid weaves a “hula hoop rug”, using strips cut from colorful old tee shirts. SunGlow Media photo

But we are also inspired to help them meet those challenges and celebrate with them as they achieve the goals and dreams they have for their own lives. The tremendous positivity of your magazine’s message, your excellent combination of up-beat life stories from those living with challenges, and supportive articles by those who help them, are very powerfully balanced by educational, informative and technical articles as well.

All of us whose lives are enriched by those with “special needs” appreciate how your magazine highlights how special they really are, allowing them to tell us in their own words about their many successes. Apostrophe magazine gives all of us great information and guidance to help those with developmental and other challenges to make this a positive life journey! Giving voice, suggestions, and solutions to so many helps take the mystery out of what sometimes seems like an endless set of daunting roadblocks. The optimistic spirit that helps us along the difficulties of life’s paths, whatever our challenges, is certainly the feeling one gets after reading your magazine! I congratulate Apostrophe in being completely true to your philosophy of “Focusing on PEOPLE-not their disABILITIES!”

Dr. Judith K. Weinstein, MD
Founder/Director, Jubilation Creations®, Inc.
Collingswood, N.J.
jubilationcreations.org

Apostrophe should be in every bookstore

My name is John Morton. I reside in Trenton, N.J. I work for The Arc Mercer, an organization for people with disabilities.

My position is recreation manager, and I also oversee our Aftercare program. Within that program we created a newspaper called the Respite Reader. One of our writers/coeditors

Marlene Brockington, while in Washington, D.C., at The Arc National Convention, met the editor of Apostrophe.

He asked Marlene would she write about her life. At that point we never knew this magazine even existed for people with disabilities and anyone else who wanted to read it. I was very happy reading the stories in the magazine and the attention that our population would receive. Apostrophe lets the world know that, yes, I may have a disability, but I am human too. Apostrophe gives opportunities that a lot of other magazines would be frightened to do. It’s great to be noticed and to be able to write a story for such a great magazine. Apostrophe is very informative and has a lot of great ads.

It has to bring a smile to the ones that get an opportunity to write and also to the ones who are reading the stories. It’s great to know what you are reading is being written by

someone who feels like you do. Apostrophe should be in every bookstore, supermarket and corner store — a voice for a population that needs a voice in today’s society.

John Morton
The Arc Mercer
Trenton, N.J.
arcmercer.org

Filled with insightful stories

I’d like to thank you for publishing Apostrophe magazine. This publication offers unique and informative insights rarely found on newsstands today. It is filled with in-depth articles on topics that matter to all people, not just those touched by disabilities. The stories are current, fresh and engaging. I appreciate the range in topics from special education and innovation to fashion and diet. Whether a professional in the field looking for new technologies or a consumer wanting to know the latest styles, you can find it in Apostrophe’s pages. From last quarter’s issue, I especially enjoyed the autobiographical story from William Monaghan, president of Delaware People First. “The Power of Percussion” was also a deeply moving article about the strength of the human spirit.

I appreciate the magazine’s research into new books and films that recently hit the market. It is a one-stop resource for what is of interest to your readers. My company’s latest documentary, “Certain Proof,” had the fortunate honor of being highlighted in your “What to Watch” section in the Spring 2013 issue. We are grateful for the article and for being included in this wonderful magazine.

I look forward with great anticipation to the next issue knowing that it will be filled with insightful stories! Thank you for all the work that goes into each issue!

Ray Ellis
ray@footpathpictures.

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